me1511172 My apologies for a 72-hour absence from the wild and wacky world-wideboy web. I hope this post will make up for it.


Yahoo has to be one of the world’s most unpleasant companies, and easily the most crooked, underhand ISP of all time. I have lost three days of blogging and social media intercourse now thanks this economic bacillus…and it’s not the first time.

Five years ago, I was caught out by their “marketing technique” of hiding in the tiny print of third-party updates. Ever since, I’ve been the most obsessive checker of boxes ticked in my name. Eighteen months ago I traced an internet nuisance multi-IP user back to them. They ignored my evidence, so it took Interpol and the FBI to kick them up the yahoo in the end.

Yesterday I used my Tweakbit software to update some drivers. This is an automated process in which tick-boxing doesn’t play a part. But the next time I used my browser, there was Yahoo, large as life, or should I say lice.

Lice is the operative word; you know how you have to twist their heads anti-clockwise and then pull gently to get the rest of a louse out? Well with Yahoo, it’s about fifty times harder and rather more like Ridley Scott’s alien. I uninstalled it of course, but as always there’s a shadow file on my system, and so Yahoo stuck hard.

The only solution in the end is to uninstall the browser one was using, and then fall back on the factory fitted Microsoft interrnet Explorer to reinstall a new version….after asking Malware Bytes to sweep for the offending imposter.

Imagine my horror when I discovered that Explorer had been expunged. Bytes didn’t find the shadow louse, because I hadn’t updated it since getting here ten days ago.
So just put all that together: Yahoo’s fascist selling can’t be seen during an update, it is edging ahead of the malware companies, it’s probaby now hacking updates…and when you try and get rid of it….heh! Tt has learned how to wipe out your backup. Waydergo!

Yahoo was flogged off to Verizon (another bunch of sociopathic net élitists) 18 months ago in a $5billion fire sale. So for its CEO Marissa Mayer, crime really didn’t pay. But she isn’t in jail. And Verizon isn’t under investigation for buying a company they knew to be amoral…either that or they conducted the most blasé superficial due diligence in corporate history.

Welcome to 21st century Corporate Planet Earth.

Meanwhile, 5-star gratitude goes to Beach shack owner Cyril and his boyhood classmate Hedwig who dug me out of the elephant pit at zero cost. You see, beyond the Senior Veep floor people are still nice.

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I think Oscar Wilde coined the phrase about knowing “the price of everything and the value of nothing”. A hundred years on – in a different context with a different meaning – the adage is more applicable than ever before. Around the bourses of the world, every self-styled expert knows the price of every major stock, but has little or no idea as to whether the value is realistic. Not too deep down, I’m sure almost all of them realise that pretty much everything is hugely over-valued, but whether it’s Tesla or the crude oil price, Wall Street tends to be in the business of talking up, not down…..unless, of course, the newcomer is a threat to them.

JPMorgan CEO Jamie ‘fingers’ Dimon unwittingly amused me the other day by referring to Bitcoin as “a fraud”. I woudn’t go near it either, but coming from one of the U -Boat captains who helped torpedo Lehman nine years ago, it was a bit rich. Of course, Jamonit Dimon is hacked off about the fact that Bitcoin is now “worth” nearly $370 billion, a huge sum of money…and uniquely irritating for him in that he has no influence over it whatsoever.

Spookily enough, that values crypto-currency at more than JPMC, which probably also sticks in the craw of his brass neck. It is, of course, a daft valuation, but the product itself may yet turn it to be slightly less irrelevant to the real economy than Jamie’s fiefdom.


Even the value of an entire bourse itself can be hugely misleading. The are 1,427 members valued on the the Shanghai Composite, which has “climbed” 24% percent since the direct-purchase period that propped it up during 2016. “It’s a recovery!” say the Chinabulls.

Um, no it isn’t. Almost exacty half of the stocks listed on the Shanghai have fallen over that period. They tend to be the smaller ones, reflecting the fact that Beijing piled in to save the big boys…who have also been able to use “financialised” profits to boost their bottom lines.

It’s merely another aspect of globalism (be it neoliberalism or communism) and its preference for Big….but it does show how, in some parts of the world, Crash2 is going to hit top-end shares more than most: the bigger they come, the harder they fall.

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I’ve been a consistent critic of Shale fracking since it began. Like many of the tree-hugger corps, I think its environmental risks easily wipe out whatever marginal advantage there might be in doing it….and nowhere more so than in England. Some twenty years ago, for commercial reasons I had to study the water ecology of Britain in some detail. Very few people know just how fragile our water supply is – or how easy it would be to compromise that by messing about with subterranean structures.

The experience (part of preparations for a new business pitch) changed my attitudes to water forever. Water conservation is the only dimension of being “green” where there is little or no hype: it is absolutey accurate to say that polluting even part of the UK’s water supply with something as brainless as fracking would be disastrous for our country.
The other (equally valid) part of my objection is that it’s obviously a false dawn. Every last iota of data about per rig output shows conclusively that returns diminish very quickly – and so ROI beyond the medium term is impossible.

Nobody is going to make any money, or get any certainty of supply, from fracking. But our politico-governmental élite is so chock full of vandalising suits, it would rather make a quick buck than invest in something better, safer and longer term. (Precisely the same thing applies to our energy generation system).

So it was good to see last September that shareholder groups invested in the US fracking sector held a pow-wow in New York….the output of which was “Cut the crap and tell us when you’re gonna make some money, or we’re outta here”.

Have a good weekend. And if you can’t be good, get a job in Brussels.