8 thoughts on “BRIXTON RIOTS: Thirty years on, has media discussion of social meltdown moved on?

  1. I never understand why anyone would want to live in London.
    Where I live you would get a better house than that one above for 90,000.
    Pseudo.
    PC.
    Bonkers.
    Crowded .
    Stressfull.
    Outside of the big cities few of the problems Londoners face exist.
    Still each to their own.

  2. I lived in Penge during the Brixton riots (I was determined to be in a National Comic Institution and couldn’t afford Neasden). Commuting in and out of Victoria via Brixton during those heady months, we idly curious commuters used to look down from the train slowly crossing the bridge over the Brixton Road at ranks of police in full riot gear beating their shields with their truncheons advacing up the road. My guess is that a fair few of those boys in blue would have relished the opportunity to quell public disorder among certain sections of society – especially while earning overtime.

    Your reference to Ted Knight brings back memories, too. I lived through the crusading Knight’s darkest hour . Woolly inefficiency was the order of the day as we were busy going nuclear-free and twinning with South American freedom fighters (how the news from the Lambeth Council Chamber must have cheered them as they tussled with the CIA). When I sold my share in a Kennington flat it took me days phoning Lambeth Council to discover how much Council Tax I owed because they’d never asked for any since we bought the place a few years earlier.

    Every car stopped was driven by a black person. There were always

    I’d briefly lived in a flat not far from Brixton prison. Crowbar Cottage we called it after returning from a weekend away to find over 40 jemmy marks showing attempts to break in. (Previously my girlfiend had

  3. I lived in Penge during the Brixton riots (I was determined to be in a National Comic Institution and couldn’t afford Neasden). Commuting in and out of Victoria via Brixton during those heady months, we idly curious commuters used to look down from the train slowly crossing the bridge over the Brixton Road at ranks of police in full riot gear beating their shields with their truncheons advancing up the road. My guess is that a fair few of those boys in blue would have relished the opportunity to quell public disorder among certain sections of society – especially while earning overtime.

    Your reference to Ted Knight brings back memories, too. I lived through the crusading Knight’s darkest hour. Woolly inefficiency was the order of the day as he was busy going nuclear-free and twinning with South American freedom fighters (how the news from the Lambeth Council Chamber must have cheered them as they tussled with the CIA). When I sold my share in a Kennington flat it took me days phoning Lambeth Council to discover how much Council Tax I owed because they’d never asked for any since we bought the place a few years earlier.

  4. Pingback: LONDON RIOTS POLICING: Why the Met stands for Metaphorical | The Slog

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