THE PAEDOFILE: The untold story of abuse beyond care homes

Mirror confirms what many of us have thought for years: kids are abused whether they go through the care system or not

kidstreetThe streets are every bit as dangerous as the Care System

A study conducted for Barnardos and Comic Relief (and featured in this morning’s Mirror) makes for sobering if not altogether shocking reading. It shows that on top of the more than 10,000 care home kids who go AWOL every year, nearly eight times as many run away from home. In the latter case, sexual abuse and/or exploitation lies behind the flight: and if it doesn’t, paedophiles and paedo-pimps are ever-ready predators keen to drive them into prostitution either here or abroad. Street kids are easy prey for such people.

77,000 kids run away each year. One – ‘Lily’ – told the tabloid she felt forced to have sex with older men as a way of avoiding difficult situations.

“If kids are on the street, if they run away or their parents kick them out, there are men out there who will take advantage of them,” she said. “If you’ve got nowhere else to go, you’ll have sex with them. It’s better than sleeping out and getting raped by someone you don’t know who could do anything to you.”

Well now, isn’t that a cheery picture of Cruel Britannia in 2013?

Two important facts need to be faced here. First, the breakdown of Britain’s family model is now one of crisis proportions. Over the last 36 hours (surrounding the Benefit Cap debate) there has been much talk of ‘welfare scroungers’. Here at The Slog yesterday I repeated the stat nobody likes to read: that 1 in 5 UK adults of working age do nothing. But the primary reason for this is they’re unemployable in a society that has, through cost-cutting and mechanisation, more or less eradicated jobs for the thick. The grandchildren of all those roadsweepers, navvies, scullery maids, park-keepers, and council labourers from seventy or more years ago are now on Britain’s sofas….many of them bringing up kids with no partner around, and a  good proportion of whom have drug and alcohol problems. Those kids enter a lifestyle where having a job is abnormal, knowing your father is rare, and no day has any proper structure beyond casual crime. Some will go into care, and be abused there.

Labour’s problem is that, having spent fifteen years denying the size of the problem, people like Keith Vaz look somewhat opportunist when they bleat about it now to the media. Many of Labour’s ‘strategies’ for dealing with it were classically Blairite – ie, box-ticking fantasies. The Conservatives’ answer to the issue of welfare dependency is the stick and carrot of help and welfare cuts…naturally farmed out to privatised bucket-shops who have but one aim: names on dockets and ticks on targets. It is no more the answer than two decades of pretending that “nothing’s changed”.

Second – although it should not be allowed to distract attention from care system abuse – paedophile abuse within the family is far more widespread than most will admit; and it has nothing to do with social class or intelligence – it can occur as easily in Cheltenham as it can in Bury. The largest single problem of its detection is mothers/wives turning a blind eye to it. I have now spent a depressing seven years, on and off, delving into paedophile case histories and cover-ups all over Britain. I’d say that 1 in 4 of the victims/activists I’ve met or worked with were themselves abused at home as a child.

The authorities cannot use lack of data as the excuse for action: there are endless studies both here and in the US confirming the size of the syndrome. James E Soukup’s American work showed 27% of all women interviewed and 16% of the males reported having been sexually abused as children. UK police experts estimate that roughly 80% of all domestic sexual abuse is not reported. Girls are the more vulnerable in this case – and the chances double if a stepfather comes into the picture. Boys tend to be abused beyond the home (at school) and in care.

60% of US offenders are known to the child but are not family members; 30% are – most often, fathers.

In Britain, the NSPCC’s work shows that over 90% of children who experienced sexual abuse, were abused by someone they knew, and four out of five children (82.7%) who experienced contact sexual abuse from a peer did not tell anyone else about it.

Once again, the inhibition, secrecy and blind eyes play into the abuser’s hands. We should recognise, I think, that ‘the streets’ are just another place where opportunistic paedophiles can hide. The others – religious orders, the teaching profession, care home systems, social work, politics, fatherhood, and the police – all offer the same deadly mix of (a) the sort of respect/authority that the paedophile craves in order to dominate and bully, and (b) provide the excuse for regular access to confused or vulnerable children.

My problem with Labour is that their local politics and minority cultural contacts compromise any likelihood that they will tackle the problem. My problem with the Tories is that very, very few of them understand anything about life at the bottom of the heap – and their response to almost every social problem is one of administration rather than skilled help and care. I’m afraid politicians like an easy life and vote-winning projects. Talk to Labour councillors in Rotherham about taxi drivers there, and they’ll burble a lot about nothing. Talk to Tory MPs about re-offending rates after a prison sentence, and they will call for longer sentences. Some of them just don’t GAF, and most of them have neither to training nor IQ to get it in the first place. I repeat: not a single MP in the Commons has a degree in social anthropology. They should all have one.

For myself, I confess to coming round to the view that help for victims through more open discussion is the only way forward. Paedophilia is an inescapable reality within the male gender of our species: we are never going to eradicate it. What we can do is first, acknowledge the issue’s existence, and second, screen potentially abusive professions more rigorously – using skilled practitioners, not braindead G4S lags.

Yesterday at The Slog: Illogic across the board about the Benefit Cap

29 thoughts on “THE PAEDOFILE: The untold story of abuse beyond care homes

  1. I agree with a lot of this but this part is a bit harsh:

    “But the primary reason for this is they’re unemployable in a society that has, through cost-cutting and mechanisation, more or less eradicated jobs for the thick.”

    I don’t think all manual workers are thick, what about people with things wrong with them like Downs Syndrome and Asperger Syndrome, they’re not thick, if you get talking to some of the people with stuff wrong with them like that you can easily see that they’re not thick at all, but they might not be able to do certain things, for example a lot of Asperger Syndrome people find it a struggle to work with other people, they like to be on their own and can seem thick if you’re just talking to them but are really very intellegent.

    The other thing is the NSPCC, because they have deliberatly covered up the Pindown child abuses, and the Secret Family Court abuses, which, when you think about it, isn’t really surprising seeing that Scandalson is one of the Directors.

    Sorry to have to criticise, you know I think you are a really nice man John very brave and kind hearted but I just had to add my tuppencehapennyworth

    • I have to say that I don’t think education systems have done any thing for those who are either ‘thick’ as JW suggests, or who have issues such as Aspergers etc. Every crackpot idea, scheme, curriculum or whatever is always tested on the poor and those whose parents or carers are least likely to complain. Where are kids actually becoming literate and numerate? Not in state schools in disadvantaged areas but in high fee paying private schools. Let the poor kids and the kids of single mothers and no dad to speak of, the kids who have everything stacked against them be the educational guinea pigs to try out some crackpot educational brainwave just as they are the voiceless in social and cultural experiments.
      My sixpence worth.

    • “…a society that has, through cost-cutting and mechanisation, more or less eradicated jobs for the thick…”

      Every five years or so, we select some 650 of the otherwise unemployable thick, who are sent to a big place in London (attendance appears to be optional for certain Scots).

      They may have a degree (or even an excess) of venal animal cunning – but they’re undoubtedly thick (or cogitally challenged, if you want to be all PC)

    • …for example a lot of Asperger Syndrome people find it a struggle to work with other people, they like to be on their own and can seem thick if you’re just talking to them but are really very intellegent. …

      I agree with that.

      • And yet people with Aspergers can often find good paying work that is suited to them – many thrive in areas such as computer programming where obsessive attention to detail and ability to do repetitive tasks are crucial.

        I don’t think that by “thick” John means stupid, but those people generally, who for whatever reason be it education, upbringing, or temperament, are ill equiped to perform more than very simple, basic work, or alternatively to work in jobs where there is a low level of oversight or direction.

  2. Some people prefer to do manual work, because they have strong conciences, and they can’t bear to be part of the bullying regime that is stressing everyone out, there are still noble people even in this day and age

  3. Is it only a male issue? There have been several reported cases here in Australia of female teachers having sex with underage teenage boys, several cases in Catholic schools. One case in Canberra where I understand the mother found out when she checked her son’s mobile phone messages when searching through pockets prior to doing the weekly wash. The teacher was charged but got off.
    My question about better screening for teachers for example, is that it only finds those who have been caught and are on record.
    Thanks for another stimulating post JW.

    • Funny how the old double standards apply:- When I was 14 or 15 almost fifty years ago, I was at an all-male boarding school. Some of our female teachers – especially the young student teachers – were the subject of my most lurid longings & dreamings…

      And I know I was not alone in such thoughts.

      Had those fantasies ever come to fruition (alas, they never did), I do not think I would have been “irreparably damaged” but would have been considered one damn lucky little sod by most of my peers…

    • I agree Gumnut, it’s not just a male issue by about 50% perhaps more given our warped ideas on equality by some perspectives. Search MGTOW. More studies showing the equality of evil and the biased inequality of culturally Marxist feminazi imbued social studies.

      Love a good slog ;-)

  4. John – A beautiful and clear piece of writing – THANKYOU for not letting up on this. I think the most important statement you make is to link abuse with the people we know, not with the stranger in a dark coat (but yes exceptions exist).

    The idea that this is mostly done by fathers, mothers, cousins and uncles is utterly terrifying. And yet, it is true.

    When you look at the effects of sexual abuse on people, and how much it actually happens – little wonder that so many people make terrible decisions on a daily basis.

    I believe it is one of the meta-loops that humans have been stuck in for a while. It’s mostly hidden and yet it affects us all profoundly, breaking the silence is the first step forward.

    Thanks to the diligence and courage of people like you, it is starting to get better.

  5. “…not a single MP in the Commons has a degree in social anthropology. They should all have one.”
    Funnily enough there’s a series of 4 shorts led by Tim Harford just started on BBC R4 on just the topic. Second talk this morning by Gillian Tett of the FT who was/is an anthropologist commenting on the credit crunch.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b036tz9w
    Not exactly profound but it was making your point. Yes I think all MPs but also Ministers, Manadarins, Administrators, Generals, Presidents and Company CEO’s should have degrees in anthropology.
    Mind you they’d probably then go and use their new-found skills to manipulate us even more viz Anthrops and and Socios in the Ad Biz [well, they used to be in MY day, Guv - just speaking for m'self]

  6. “…not a single MP in the Commons has a degree in social anthropology. They should all have one.”
    Funnily enough there’s a series of 4 shorts led by Tim Harford just started on BBC R4 on just the topic. Second talk this morning by Gillian Tett of the FT who was/is an anthropologist commenting on the credit crunch.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b036tz9w
    Not exactly profound but it was making your point. Yes I think all MPs but also Ministers, Manadarins, Administrators, Generals, Presidents and Company CEO’s should have degrees in anthropology.
    Mind you they’d probably then go and use their new-found skills to manipulate us even more viz Anthrops and and Socios in the Ad Biz [well, they used to be in MY day, Guv - just speaking for m'self]

    • ““…not a single MP in the Commons has a degree in social anthropology…”

      I very much doubt there’s more than a couple who could even spell it;- and far fewer who would actually know what it was…

  7. Pingback: John Ward – The Paedofile: The Untold Story of Abuse Beyond Care Homes – 16 July 2013 | Lucas 2012 Infos

  8. Pingback: INTERNET ETHICS: ‘Cheating can be fun’ – courtesy of Wired magazine | The Slog. 3-D bollocks deconstruction

  9. This is bollocks: “Here at The Slog yesterday I repeated the stat nobody likes to read: that 1 in 5 UK adults of working age do nothing. But the primary reason for this is they’re unemployable in a society that has, through cost-cutting and mechanisation, more or less eradicated jobs for the thick.”
    Nope, about 2.4 million are students and another 2..4 million are housewives/husbands, carers and the like. They are not `doing nothing’. About 2 million are long-term sick (and therefore Atos-ed); then there are pensioners (some lucky bastards do get to retire before 90) etc etc. Some are indeed classified as `discouraged’ and I suppose they might be watching Mr Kyle etc, but there aren’t a whole lot of them. Numbers are all on the ONS site.

    This : “The grandchildren of all those roadsweepers, navvies, scullery maids, park-keepers, and council labourers from seventy or more years ago are now on Britain’s sofas….many of them bringing up kids with no partner around, and a good proportion of whom have drug and alcohol problems. Those kids enter a lifestyle where having a job is abnormal, knowing your father is rare, and no day has any proper structure beyond casual crime.”

    I’m afraid this is just repeating the Daily Mail’s bollocks and indulging your prejudices. Not what you’d call a pretty sight. And if you’re going to fall for this rubbish, how much is the rest of your analysis worth?

    • Sorry, Harry, you are wrong.

      We have three pubs at the top of our town, filled to overflowing by young and able skivers who have not worked in years, and have no intention of doing so. They get more on the social than they would ever achieve while working. Plus they all do cash only jobs on the side – hence they always have enough dough to sit in the pub all weekend.

      And this is not a unique example. In my estimation, nobody works in the town down the road, and yet the pubs are always full. “Here comes the mug”, they chant as I stroll in (I work, you see).

      Harry, I would advise you do some political leafleting, and march around the down-and-out estates in your area. If you happen to live in leafy Bucks, please do this in the inner suburbs of Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool, Crewe or Leeds and the like. There is a song about this, by Ralph McTell, you should listen to it again.

  10. This is a lazy piece.

    The thought that a society can solve, or even seriously improve; a situation of sexual perversion and moral decay, through a paperwork checking CRB type bureaucracy is just plain lazy.
    The problem is not one of having the correct paperwork.
    ……….sigh.

  11. Pingback: THE PAEDOFILE: Canadian progressive sex-education boss charged with involvement in global paedophile porn | The Slog. 3-D bollocks deconstruction

  12. So a paedophile was involved in formulating a sex education policy. How predictable.

    That is like the Catholic catechism textbook from Belgium called Roeach, by the Catholic University of Leuven headed by by Monsignor Vangheluwe. Here is an image from Roeach – the little girl is saying: “stroking my pussy makes me feel groovy”. Monsignor Vangheluwe, needless to say, was a paedophile himself.

    [IMG]http://i41.tinypic.com/jj2137.jpg[/IMG]

    And what of Vlaams Blok, the right wing political party that had exposed this scandal? The Belgium government declared it illegal and closed it down, despite it previously getting 25% of the vote.

  13. >>Every crackpot idea, scheme, curriculum or whatever is
    >>always tested on the poor and those whose parents or
    >>carers are least likely to complain.

    That reminds me of, errrm, “Peggy” a Labour peer at a dinner party.

    Q. Peggy, I thought you campaigned for comprehensive education, so why is your charming litter going to private schools?

    A. Oh, daaarrrrling, one does not experiment with one’s own children…

  14. I have tried to question how child abuse information is collected in the UK both locally with my local council & direct with the DFE & as far as I am aware they do not collect any information on child abuse offenders just on the children. I would like to see a Royal Commission looking at child abuse in the UK just like they recently had in Australia & I would not be surprised if the outcomes were not very similar.

    Best regards Dave

    http://www.ukfamilylawreform.co.uk/childrenofbreakupssaferwiththeirdads5thseptember2003.htm

    Sue Price, told the inquiry despite the “maternal preference” of the Family Law Court in custody battles, statistics showed children were more likely to be abused, or even killed, when in the custody of their mothers. “The research shows children are safer with their biological fathers,” she said. An Australian Institute of Health and Welfare report had found 42 per cent of substantiated abuse – including physical, emotional and sexual abuse – happened in single-female-parent families, she said. The report said only 4 per cent of abuse occurred in single-male-parent families.

    Mrs. Price also said mothers had been identified as the primary suspect/perpetrator in 25 of 40 deaths deemed “family” murders in NSW between 1996 and 1999. The studies exposed the myth that most child abuse was perpetrated “by all these violent men out there”.

    NSPCC ignores its own research which showed mothers are more violent 2nd March 2006 http://www.ukfamilylawreform.co.uk/nspccignoresitsownresearchwhichshowedmothersaremoreviolent2ndmarch2006.htm

    Nobody in Government collects any information on child abuse perpetrators 27th February 2013
    http://www.ukfamilylawreform.co.uk/nobodyingovernmentcollectsanyinformationonchildabuseperpetrators27thfebruary2013.htm

    Children do better when raised by their fathers 1998 http://www.ukfamilylawreform.co.uk/childrendobetterwhenraisedbytheirfathers1998.htm

  15. There is a glaring gap in statistics….. ie there are many undisclosing victims/survivors of childhood abuse, unable to function, being labelled as mentally ill, with no real effective help offered, who are within the figures but not recognised therefore. For a moment, ponder the figures of what has so far been disclosed, and with the institutions, it has had to be and still is being forced out, ponder how many walking wounded there are, with scars never cleansed. In that regard, like John, i have only ever been able to think that by being more open, and relieving the stigma, so that more of those it happened to, can be at least registered. On another blog here, i mentioned that i am doubting the 90% figure of familial, or familiar person abuse, though my experience was within the home, i too ran away, many times, and yes there were predators everywhere. We simply don,t have the statistics, over the years i can,t say that of the thousands i have spoken with there is a definite pattern, one way or another, except that 90% of them, had never told anyone else, and were not planning to either. Currently 90% of people on facabook, or other platforms, that campaign or support others, or write their experiences up, hide their identity. There are no specific ways to disclose abuse, say to a GP, that means that obviously helpful things are automatically offered.

  16. Pingback: THE PAEDOFILE: Why our leaders are offside on the paedophile issue…. | The Slog. 3-D bollocks deconstruction

  17. Pingback: John Ward – The Paedofile : Why Our Leaders Are Offside On The Paedophile Issue – 25 July 2013 | Lucas 2012 Infos

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