Getting By: rolled shoulder of lamb with mint and Fetta cheese

I’m still at it. Raping the multiple supermarkets’ margins, that is. Bargains picked up in the last four days include:

- 4 packs of Fetta cheese reduced from £1.97 to 19p

- Lamb Shanks from £6.99 to £2.50

- Vegetarian Chicken from £6.00 to £3.00

Any time mid to late afternoon – and especially on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday, or any day after a Bank Holiday – can unearth this kind of treasure at the Reduced to Clear counters. These sort of bargains are the only good thing ever to come out of mad Health & Safety, so “Il faut profiter” as the French say.

Finding a block of fine Fetta at a price of 19p means you can turn a small, cheap rolled part-shoulder of lamb (they can be as little as £2.97) into a fabulous supper-party starter for four people. This is what yer do:

Snip the string and unroll the shoulder fragment. Crumble the fetta into bits and add a small nob of butter to form a paste. Now add to the paste some mint sauce concentrate (Colmans is still the best) and then coat the upside of the unrolled meat in that mixture.

Roll it up again, restring it, and cook slowly (at around 150C). There’s no point giving you a time, as these rolled-up bargains come in all the shapes and size. But when you take it out swimming in naughtiness and it melts under the knife, it’s ready: take a very sharp blade, slice the log into four Swiss rolls, and Bob’s yer uncle. It doesn’t look that pretty on the plate, but it smells like rapture might, and you could very easily expire from the pleasure of eating it.

Read the rest of the posts at Getting By

29 thoughts on “Getting By: rolled shoulder of lamb with mint and Fetta cheese

  1. OT a bit but. Question for JW and or any willing Slogger.

    While reading Ambrose Evans-Pritchard’s column on Italy’s banks, I was struck by a bit of cognitive dissonance when reading that Italia’s debt is ~ 1.9 Trillion Euros. That didn’t shock me, what did was when I mentally tried to convert that into dollars. I went reflexively, faster than thought for a 1.4 or so multiple, and then realized: ‘whoa there boy, that’s far from correct now — you need only use a 1.274 multiple or so.’

    My question is — does the dipping of the euro relative to the dollar make the Euro country’s debt somehow worth much less? And thus easier to pay off? Or is way more complex than that?

    • @ Geo,in an ideal world,banks keep a balance between their assets and liabilities in the same currency,so forex movements do not matter.As for nation states,that borrow in US$ or some cocktail of SDR’s to replenish their reserves,if they are in the Euro,there is a potential problem.Just ask a Hungarian that took out a Swiss Franc mortgage!Of course, banks in the real world do not do the safety first approach,which is why in 1976 my business school course on international finance was tutored by the man that had cost Deutsche Bank about 10 percent of their balance sheet.It is not complex.Just ask JPMorgan and their CIO(designed to reduce risk,ha ha,the casino where half the group’s profits came from).’The dipping of the euro’, I like it,will expose a few charlatans in the banking sector in all the continental banks.

      • @william

        Very kind of you to take the time with all that. I really appreciate it, there is much enough confusing finance around now and in the past to me. Wish I had your education, I might then find some joy in all of it.

    • Er yes, EXCUSE ME….. but as a chicken keeper myself, there is no such thing as a vegetarian chicken!!! I remember an ad a while ago about free-range, supposedly vegetarian chickens, which is a loads of codswallop (or bollocks, according to this site). Any chicken that is allowed to range is not vegetarian. They just love slugs, flies, caterpillars, bugs and so on. Chickens are definitely NOT vegetarian! My chickens will even eat dog poo, but the eggs are delicious.

  2. The vegetarian chicken option sounds odd to me, too. But then I don’t know of any carnivorous chickens either.

    • I think he means what we call in the US the ‘free range’ chickens or the ‘organic’ ones — meaning the ones not fed on any antibiotics, not cooped up their whole lives, and not fed any questionable meal perhaps containing animal parts or supplements.

  3. I had a horrible feeling he meant vegetarian chicken as in a conglomerate of tsp and quorn and msg and pzq and e28475034 , but surely that would not be a man of JW’s intellectual sharpitude?

  4. ‘Lamb shanks’? I wouldn’t touch lamb with a barge pole. Now that I know, that all NZ Lamb is ‘cruelly’ slaughtered, and that it is also pretty hard to find any British lamb (and maybe chicken also,) that has not been despatched to the high standard of the British Veterinary Association, thank you – NO.
    Everything else here John, is always a great read. But with lamb, you have, as they say ‘Touched a Nerve’. (usually in the neck).

    • Yes, I believe that ALL New Zealand Lamb is now halal. I wont touch it anymore.
      Why wont they tell us these things? I now go to a local butcher, having asked him if any of his meat is halal and being told no. I do live in rural France – but there is NZ lamb at the supermarket, unlabelled of course!
      ie. no mention of halal.

      • WTF? There is no ‘uncruel’ way to slaughter meat for the table.
        If kosher or halal bothers you, you should stick to vegetables.

      • Just drop off a nice pack of pork sausages in the lamb displays. Voila, non halal food at a stroke.

      • That’s because their main market is Asian where-guess what-there are a lot of Muslims!
        the lamb still tastes great, though.

  5. Well, I love chicken and my wife does some very good vegetarian meals
    so I can deal with vegetarian chicken. Mind you, the chicken politicians are something else.

  6. A veg chicken is one that is kept indoors and fed grain and other dubious nutrients that are not natural to its normal diet.

      • Nope, there are few if any critters on this planet whose natural diet is grain – humans included and certainly not chooks as Bellevue pointed out.

        Have read (I think via Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall) that chickens that are free-range have high levels of omega oils and are very good for you; whereas barn reared veggie ones are actively noxious.

  7. It is when I read responses such as those (all those?) above that I realise I am at the least as ignorant as I feared and probably even more so than I dare think. Vegtarian Chicken? I pass, I think.

  8. Sounds like a waste of good meat and cheese to me, but I’ve got very Greek in my taste and tend to cross myself when I hear about funny foreign food like “mint sauce concentrate”. And it’s “feta” with one :t”!

  9. My Brother used to think he was a chicken, the Dr. asked why I didn’t have him sectioned, I said I would but I needed the eggs!!!

  10. I have been making nettle saag, because I might as well get some goodness out of the nettles which are growing just about everywhere instead of just big stings.

  11. 1.97 GBP is around 2.50 euros….what is the quantity of feta cheese that you get at the price?
    In Greece 1 Kg costs between 8 to 10 euros, (depends on the brand).

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